News & Features

Pavement Parking Consultation

Posted in General News on Friday, October 2nd, 2020

The government has launched another public consultation to explore the possibility of introducing stricter laws against pavement parking. Pavement parking is particularly problematic for wheelchair and scooter users, visually impaired people, and other vulnerable road users because it forces them into the road and potentially into the path of oncoming traffic. Therefore, the Department for Transport (DfT) has identified three possible ways to tackle the issue and they would like to hear your views on which of these three options should be implemented.

The first option is to rely on improvements being made to the process of implementing Traffic Regulation Orders (TROs). TROs make signage and road markings enforceable via the issuing of Penalty Charge Notices (PCNs). However, they are currently time-consuming and costly to introduce so there are plans to make their implementation simpler and more efficient. The second option would involve giving local authorities with Civil Parking Enforcement (CPE) powers the ability to enforce ‘unnecessary pavement obstruction’. This would mean that Civil Enforcement Officers (CEOs) could issue PCNs to offending motorists as and when they spot them. At this stage, the government is not proposing a full decriminalisation of unnecessary pavement obstruction because the department understand that some situations will still need to be dealt with by the police. The third option would be to extend the pavement parking ban that already exists in London so that it covers the whole nation. In this situation local authorities would be expected to ascertain where pavement parking remained necessary and put signage in place to indicate that pavement parking is permitted in these areas.

The DfT is very keen to hear from individuals as well as organisations on this matter and you can find out more information about the proposals in the consultation and submit your response by visiting www.gov.uk the consultation closes on 22nd November 2020.

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Sylvia Reynolds's Gravatar
Sylvia Reynolds

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

The cars and bigger vans are a wretched nuisance when you want to go out and they are blocking the footpath. We don't always get out as much as able people so it would be nice to go out easily.

Marion Sugrue's Gravatar
Marion Sugrue

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

A complete ban for all vehicles across the country would be better for the safety for both disabled and non disabled people but this is a problem that has gone on for years! Nothing ever seems to work because of lack of funds and bodies on the ground!

Malcolm k birch's Gravatar
Malcolm k birch

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

A total ban in pavement parking..

david taylor's Gravatar
david taylor

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

Please ban pavement parking. I live in Burnley Lancashire, the road has a 20mph limit which suggests that the authority is aware of the safety issues however some people park covering half of the pavement often not considering the position of other obstacles such as lampposts which limits the space to pass. Using a mobility scooter I cannot get past , nor can I dismount the pavement as it is too high therefore I need to reverse downhill until I can find a dropped kerb, then illegally use my pavement scooter on the road to continue my journey.

Brian Bremer's Gravatar
Brian Bremer

Friday, September, 18th, 2020

I am fully in support of rolling out the existing law in London. Firstly why should the rest of England have a separate rule? Also why is it the Government thinks on pavement parking affects only the Capital? Wheelchair users, mobility scooter users, walking stick/frame users and Blind are all affected wherever they are in the UK. Also this affects parents with babies in proms. Local Councils are equally culpable I creating problems by permitting Developers to flout the Law. Most new Housing Estates have a total lack of parking for occupants, they Highways Authorities avoid installing Double Yellow lines in strategic places. Most car owners have no idea that on pavement parking is in fact illegal. They are mostly ignorant to knowledge that paying a Duty to the Exchequer only gives all motorists the right to pass along the Highway, there is no right to parking on any part of a Highway, with the exception of Private roads. So, also the Police and Traffic Wardens need to do their jobs fully and properly. Bring on the Fines by all means, but they must go towards improving parking off road and upgrading pavements not to swell local coffees

margaret atkinson's Gravatar
margaret atkinson

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

The law defiantly needs to be rolled out nation wide the government and local councils should be held accountable to make pedestrians, disabled and all footpath users can safely use the footpath without obstructions. These can at the moment be called an obstruction so the police should be able to ticket them for this? The only option that might work is option 3 but even that is only as good as the amount of officers who are available to go round the roads.

Mary Wells-Walker's Gravatar
Mary Wells-Walker

Friday, September, 18th, 2020

I have written to my MP on this matter and received a comprehensive reply pointing out that exemptions to a ban would be necessary in some instances, i.e narrow streets and cul de sacs. I appreciate the point as obviously many streets were built long before people had vehicles. However some new Estates are being built without adequate provision for vehicle parking and this needs to be ameliorated. Even where parking spaces have been provided some people ignore them and continue to park in front of their properties at the road side. I am a Scooter user and frequently find I am unable to get past vehicles parked half on pavements. Another problem I have is that some pavements have a slope which gives the feeling of tipping over. This means I have to go onto the road. I live in a country village. This is going to be a hard nut to crack

David Connell's Gravatar
David Connell

Friday, September, 18th, 2020

The first option is already legal and NOT WORKING. The second option would not work because at present they do NOTHING. So the only option that MIGHT work is option 3.

Carol Hull's Gravatar
Carol Hull

Friday, September, 18th, 2020

Pavement parking creates a nightmare for wheelchairs. Even those parked on the road blocking a lowered kerb are as seriously disturbing because crashing down 4-8inches off some kerbs in a wheelchair is horrendous especially if you have an appointment & no time to waste. The surfaces of pavements with overgrown Shrubs & trees, horse and dog poop and much more need to be taken into consideration. I defy any councillors or MP’s to travel a mile in a wheelchair along any pavements which stop and start and where you have to cross roads to reach another pavement. They have no idea at all, last wk I went from east of Preston docklands to south, I experienced all of the above but the bone shaking mess that journey left me in, was awful, and I wanted to cry when I reached my appointment. I needed more pain relief and a hot brew to revive me a little. I certainly wasn’t fit to take a test drive as I had planned.

Chrissie Eggleton's Gravatar
Chrissie Eggleton

Friday, September, 18th, 2020

something needs to be done about pavement parking. I have been running the gauntlet with a neighbour and her builders parking on the pavement. I'm now accused of starting a campaign against her builders and being a bully all because I don't want to pass vehicles on road going against oncoming traffic.

John Lane's Gravatar
John Lane

Saturday, September, 19th, 2020

I have to park across my driveway, partly on the road & partly on the pavement as my 'driveway' is too short to take a car and my garAGE is too narrow to take my MPV (adapted to carry my wheelchair) with enough room to get in/out. If I had to park completely on the road the bin lorries and other large vehicles could not get past myu car. I started parkling this way when a bin lorry scraped the side of my car when reversing down the road. I should point out that I am a power wheelchair user and ALWAYS leave enough room on the pavement for other wheelchair users etc. When out and about in my wheelchair, I often find vehicles blocking the pavements and dropped kerbs. As a result I have to either retrace my steps or manouvre into the road - which is VERY DANGEROUS. My wheelchair was hit by a van driver recently as he 'wanted me to hurry up'!!

Mike Walker's Gravatar
Mike Walker

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

I will comment more fully when I've more time but would like to say at this stage driving on the pavement is already illegal but is rarely enforced so leaving it up to the police to enforce parking on the pavement would probably change very little. ! ( you have to dive onto the pavement to park.! )

Mark McIntyre 's Gravatar
Mark McIntyre

Sunday, September, 20th, 2020

+1 for what Brian said. I live in a village in oxfordshire, and pavement parking here prevents my disabled wife from going out some days. She's even got trapped away from home, unable to get back till the car moved. Once, while trying to get round a parked car, her scooter overturned throwing her into the road and knocking her out and trapping her. An oncoming car nearly hit her and she had to be seen by paramedics. Since then, she's given up trying to get to the post box on the green. Thats a rare occurence but surely not something anyone should have to put up with.

Ken Fernandes's Gravatar
Ken Fernandes

Monday, September, 21st, 2020

There should be enforcement/parking fine. Parking on pavements should have bee sorted by now. This is a failure of planning and ignoring parking requirements when they urban sprawl developments for years. Considering UK has vehicles and a 100+ years development and the Government and Council have not updated planning. They even forgot that the new trucks [2.9 m] wide, need more road space than the old ones. Beside buses. No one has updated the standard road width or comply with 'Manual of streets or Sustainable drainage. Another consultation and the outcome hopefully will be a LAW ; not a recommendation or best practice which the councils can ignore. Infrastructure road failure of planning detail.

A J Powell 's Gravatar
A J Powell

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

Have considered the amount of terriced houses builds with no parking provide because so few cars in those day and now nearly every house as at least one

ANN SPEECHLEY's Gravatar
ANN SPEECHLEY

Monday, October, 5th, 2020

IT IS REALLY ENCOURAGING TO HEAR THAT SOMETHING IS GOING TO BE DONE REGARDING PAVEMENT PARKING, NOT ONLY BY WHEELCHAIR AND SCOOTER USERS, BUT PRAM PUSHERS WILL ALSO BENEFIT TOO. i AM A TOTAL WHEELCHAIR USER, AND WE MANY OBSTACLERS TO TRY TO FIND A WAY ROUND. AS FAR AS PAVEMENT PARKING IS CONCERNED, NOT ONLY CAN YOU NOT GET ROUND A PAVEMENT PARKER, THERE WOULD RARELY BE A DROPPED KERB TO GET DOWN, THERE WOULD RARELY BE A DROPPED KERB TO GET BACK ON TO THE PAVEMENT ONCE YOU CAN GET BACK ON TO THE PAVEMENT AGAIN.. IT IS A NUISANCE FOR CAR OWNERS WHO LIVE SOMEWHERE OLD, WHEN PEOPLE DID NOT HAVE CARS, BUT THE MAJORITY OF PEOPLE WHO PARK ON PAVEMENTS IN THIS SITUATION HAVE LEGS!! UNFORTUNATELY RESPECT AND DISIPLINE HAVE ALL BUT VANISHED IN THIS COUNTRY, AND THE UNDER DOGS PAY FOR THIS EVERY TIME. I THINK THAT HEAVY FINES SHOULD BE APPLIED, ONCE A LAW IS MADE. EVEN BLUE BADGE HOLDERS LIKE MYSELF SHOULD NOT BE EXEMPT, WE HAVE TO ABIDE BY OTHER RULES IE:- LOADING BAYS ETC.

Michael John Latcham's Gravatar
Michael John Latcham

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

The law as it stands says it is already illegal to park on the pavement, section of law reads, "London and anywhere else", at the moment there is no will enforce, so the questions need to changed to encompass the current law, why or why not, explanation please architects of the written law. ???

Ken Fernandes's Gravatar
Ken Fernandes

Monday, September, 21st, 2020

This is a failure of planning and ignoring parking requirements when they urban sprawl developments for years. Considering UK has vehicles and a 100+ years development and the Government and Council have not updated planning. They even forgot that the new trucks [2.9 m] wide, need more road space than the old ones. Beside buses. No one has updated the standard road width or comply with 'Manual of streets or Sustainable drainage. Another consultation and the outcome hopefully will be a LAW ; not a recommendation or best practice which the councils can ignore.

Brian Bremer's Gravatar
Brian Bremer

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

Whilst this is all fine in London and larger Towns and Cities, I do wonder how these rules are going to be enforceable on minor side roads and residential roads where a Nationally this on pavement parking is a major concern. Developers build Estates where parking is inadequate and roads are too narrow unless on pavement parking can happen. Also cars, even so called compact are now much larger than cars made 20-30 years ago, this further adds to parking issues. I do agree though that Enforcement needs to be rolled out, as to who will Enforce this will be almost impossible due to a lack of “manpower”! What also is required is publicised education through the media so that the public at large can understand that on pavement parking has a major impact on various sectors of people! Without re-education and enforcement, nothing will change.

William Hawkes's Gravatar
William Hawkes

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

I have yet to encounter ANY instance where pavement parking is entirely necessary. On that ground alone, I would advocate for an entire blanket ban on pavement parking which would mean that a criminal offense is committed when a car owner parks on the footpath. The criminal offense would be "the negligent endangerment of another's life without due care and attention". As I cannot see any true reason for any exceptions, I am reluctant to comment on any exceptions to the law, however, I do accept that I am not in a position of having seen every single road so there may be exceptions, and for this, I would advocate a permit system to allow for the ability to park on a pavement. The issuing of permits to allow for pavement parking where absolutely necessary would be specific to a location and would form an income for the councils.

Robert Boswell's Gravatar
Robert Boswell

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

Ban and enforce pavement parking unless the pavement is wide enough to allow a wheelchair etc to pass easily. I am a power wheelchair user and am always having to go in the road to pass vehicles parked on the pavement.

Cathryn Thaiss's Gravatar
Cathryn Thaiss

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

All pavement parking should be banned. . Being an electric wheelchair user I regularly find myself having to go back on myself to find a dropped kerb I get down to then put myself at risk by scooting along the road, unlicensed, and then having to find another dropped kerb to get back onto the pavement. Prosecution should be possible by submission of a clear photograph showing the violation. Would be nice to stop vehicles blocking dropped kerbs too!

Clive Stevens's Gravatar
Clive Stevens

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

Obviously options 1 and 2 are not working?? Option 3 is the only alternative but it must be enforced , with some local council approved exemptions. Council Planning must be legally bound to have the right amount of onsite parking available for ALL new developments. My local planning office has recently passed 4x semi detached houses with 3 bedrooms, all with only 1 onsite parking space each. This is obviously encouraging illegal parking!! The site in question is located on a very sharp bend with double yellow lines on both sides of the A road?? I was under the impression that all pavement parking WAS ILLEGAL!

Dr Gerald Levy 's Gravatar
Dr Gerald Levy

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

I am a power wheelchair user and live in a small village just outside Chester. The narrow"main" road through the village is a "rat run" between two busy A roads. Cars very often park partly on the pavements to avoid blocking the road which makes it very dangerous for me to use the chair, even just going a couple of hundred metres. On one occasion I was forced to come off the pavement without a lowered kerb which resulted in my chair turning over with my leg pinned underneath it. I was helped up by a passing van, with the driver of the parked car saying she had "no choice" but to park on the pavement. Any law is pointless unless people obey it or it can be enforced. Parking on the pavement in Cheshire is not considered to be important to the local police (or much else for that matter!) . Just as well we disabled people are not allowed to vote I suppose !

Mr Martin Herbert's Gravatar
Mr Martin Herbert

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

I am a pavement scooter user and anything to Stop pavement parking is great . I've had this outside my house blocking the pavement totally So no person with scooter wheelchairs and pushchairs.

Wendy Hooper's Gravatar
Wendy Hooper

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

I think 3 would be the quickest and easiest to inforce. There is too many people putting other peoples lives at risk by parking on the pavement. Plus this damages the pavement. Total ban on pavement parking

joseph  perera's Gravatar
joseph perera

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

Pavement parking should be band but also shop bill boards should be looked at as they also block the pavement when they are put out to far

Rosie Smith's Gravatar
Rosie Smith

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

Option 3 - there should be no discrimination across England and the UK. Where I live pavement parking is a nightmare - big cars causing blockages for all on narrow private roads in a fairly new housing estate where there are many seniors with mobility issues, wheelchair users and an abundance of mums with prams.

Belinda  Blackburn 's Gravatar
Belinda Blackburn

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

I understand the frustration of cars in the pavement but as a wheelchair user & a motorist I can see both sides Many of our streets were not designed to take motor vehicles _ as such if people didn't park on the pavements traffic movement would come to a stol

Lucy McGrother's Gravatar
Lucy McGrother

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

Any changes pavement parking has to be done in conjunction with alternative suitable parking provision being provided at the same time. There are many places around where we live where the roads are simply not wide enough to support full on road parking. Those cars need somewhere else to go - as they are on terraced streets with no gardens. Because just stopping pavement parking will not resolve the issues it will just replace them with different ones that are just as frustrasting

Geneve Muckell's Gravatar
Geneve Muckell

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

There should be a total ban across the country, nit the first or last time I have had to use the road, because people have parked on the pavement, causing upset with people driving cars as I am not supposed to be on the road, I.e, honking on there horns, which Makes me feel more vunerable than I already do.

David Nixon's Gravatar
David Nixon

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

A nation wide ban should be put into affect.

Colleen Cartwright's Gravatar
Colleen Cartwright

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

Greater Manchester, I struggle walking using crutches/ walking stick. It’s a nightmare, all footpaths on main roads should be banned from parking on footpath. All new housing estates should by law be made to make roads wider with adequate parking spaces for cars, then no excuse for parking on pavements. I have come across many badly parked cars, large vans who block pavements, making me struggle even more and in fear for my life having to go onto the road! plus also causing damage to the pavements making them uneven.If I cannot use the footpath it also means anyone in a wheel chair or pushing a pram can’t use the footpath.

Mark grant's Gravatar
Mark grant

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

it is about time the footpaths were given back to the pedestrian ,wheelchair users and parents with young children, I am a wheelchair user and a motorists, the area I live is constantly having motorists parking on the footpaths of which causes a headache for the school run , this should be made illegal to park on a footpath nationwide.what council's should do is encourage private homes to have a drive way wherever possible and with social housing turn the front garden into a driveway with partial funding where needed. Also make resident disabled bays same as parking bays in towns etc.

William Hawkes's Gravatar
William Hawkes

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

I have yet to encounter ANY instance where pavement parking is entirely necessary. On that ground alone, I would advocate for an entire blanket ban on pavement parking which would mean that a criminal offense is committed when a car owner parks on the footpath. The criminal offense would be "the negligent endangerment of another's life without due care and attention". As I cannot see any true reason for any exceptions, I am reluctant to comment on any exceptions to the law, however, I do accept that I am not in a position of having seen every single road so there may be exceptions, and for this, I would advocate a permit system to allow for the ability to park on a pavement. The issuing of permits to allow for pavement parking where absolutely necessary would be specific to a location and would form an income for the councils.

Mr Marshall's Gravatar
Mr Marshall

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

Yes bring in this ban my wife is a wheelchair user and find it hard with cars pavement 2.10.2020 Mr Marshall

Linda Dawson's Gravatar
Linda Dawson

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

All very foolish...the roads in the west midlands were made for horses...all houses need cars as bus routes do not cover areas well and therefore each house especially terraced need to park on pavements either side of the road. Leaving single flow traffic and good manners a necessity. My personal situation is that I'm disabled, on very low income with no parking space on my front garden. Being the only house in my street without a parking space (due to Sandwell council refusing to help with cost, forms, measurements which were previously done by their surveyors and architects, I tried for 5 years and it was hopeless). I could have a painted on road disabled space but this would impede the flow of heavy traffic which is constant to the container base in my road and football club. Therefore everyone who stops to use their phone, parks in front of my house, so as to not block all my neighbours drives. I have to park on pavement, cannot use buses as the stops are too far away. It is futile to put the small amount of legally disabled people first if you are going to penalise and drain poor people's resources further when there are no options of alternate places to park. You are creating massive stress and hardship to all... If you need money then you should push main government into reinstating your funds that possibly were cut off and appropriated to pay the EU.

Belinda  Blackburn 's Gravatar
Belinda Blackburn

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

I understand the frustration of cars in the pavement but as a wheelchair user & a motorist I can see both sides Many of our streets were not designed to take motor vehicles _ as such if people didn't park on the pavements traffic movement would come to a holt

Mick Guy 's Gravatar
Mick Guy

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

I feel that option 3 is the most workable way forward. In certain areas cars parked with 2 wheels on the kerb do not restrict the pavement, while improving traffic flow. However, some ignorant drivers will still block or restrict access, these people must be dealt with in a forceful manner i.e clamping.

Ann Ganter's Gravatar
Ann Ganter

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

Not only in Oxford and Blackbird leys they park on the paths and also lower paths so l can not get down in an electric-wheelchair half the time also cycles cycling on the paths and even worse are the e-bikes they are dangerous in the wrong hands some as young at 10, none of these will stop or move out the way, some times they are council vans

Terry Faulkner 's Gravatar
Terry Faulkner

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

I think we should just stop parking on pavement for all traffic as it impedes all wheelchairs pushchair and scooters and other disabled people it would hopefully stop lorry’s and vans who are the main offenders and also we need to look at the drivers who flout the blue badge and use them when their isn’t a disabled person in the car

Mr weaver's Gravatar
Mr weaver

Thursday, October, 8th, 2020

All pavement parking should be banned the pavements are for pedestrians in our area there is no pavement parking restrictions and everyone parks on the pavement they all have driveways for two cars but still park on the pavement as a family with two disabled wheelchair users it is impossible to go out for a wander as we have to constantly use the road as the pavement is blocked

M.Zulfiqar's Gravatar
M.Zulfiqar

Monday, October, 5th, 2020

On pavement and on Disabled parking space parking should not be allowed.

Clare Crotty's Gravatar
Clare Crotty

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

Only this morning I had a delivery driver blocking the road and pavement They seem to think they can park anywhere Even this morning between the bollards which are meant to stop this But only ended up making it worse as the pavement and road was blocked The only way to stop it is to have a total ban This may cause some difficulties in some areas But then everybody would know where we stand I have lived in a road where parking was only on one side and that side was on the pavement but notices were up for all to see So cars could park and people on foot had a pavement unhindered to use and the road was clear to drive on So this is the only way forward with a complete ban but with leeway to have some areas made exempt But only if no other option is available Then only when all pavement users have been considered So the best can be done for drivers and pavement users alike

Jean Batty's Gravatar
Jean Batty

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

My 13 year old grandson is a wheelchair user and I worry about him negotiating parked cars in his power chair to and from school. I would support any regulations but he lives in a small market town and difficult to enforce. Because if someone parks on the pavement it's to make the road wide enough for cars to pass. Regards Jean

Glenn Wheeler's Gravatar
Glenn Wheeler

Monday, October, 5th, 2020

As a disabled pensioner on a scooter I find it very difficult to go out as cars are now parking on the pavement which means I have to brake the law by driving on the road as you just can’t get passed the car. This NOT acceptable for us disabled people

John Fawcett's Gravatar
John Fawcett

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

Yes. I have had problems with cars parking on pavements especially more so in a wheelchair. More than once I have nearly been hit by Motors. I am so angry at this because I get the finger. Its really as much as non disabled cars parked in bays not meant for them. Especialy when I cannot get my ramp down from my W.A.V.. It not just the cars they park on double yellow so that there is no room to manoeuvre my wheelchair around them nearly getting hit by other road users. taxis are the worst as they park anywhere..

Susan prescott's Gravatar
Susan prescott

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

Whilst I agree on the idea of this the problem is if traffic on both sides of the road have to park actually on the road there is not enough room for traffic to get past both ways and if I cant park in front of my house (I DONT obstruct the pavement its wide) I cant get to my home. I think the main problems are 1.when the whole car is parked on the pavement and 2.when the car is actually parked on the road but obstructing the drop down.

Malcolm Self's Gravatar
Malcolm Self

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

As a wheelchair user I get really annoyed when drivers park on the pavement which blocks my way leading to me using the road if a down ramp is near by, or having to turn around and returning home.

Emrys Davies's Gravatar
Emrys Davies

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

Your email in general relates and is addressed to disabled people but your comments about parking on pavements relates to all. Parking on pavements by non-disabled drivers vastly effects disabled people more than even considerate drivers will understand.

H.Kahlon's Gravatar
H.Kahlon

Thursday, October, 8th, 2020

A complete ban for all vehicles. In the evening you cannot go out on any payment ,if you are using a mobility scooter

Terry Hennessey's Gravatar
Terry Hennessey

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

Hi have recently sent an email to a local Councillor in Luton who passed it onto Luton Council on the issue of parking on pavements in my area. I have received a reply which I will forward to you. But I wonder if vehicles that are parking on pavements actually are legally covered by insurance as it's not supposed to park this way. If this is so I would like to point this out to the Council which they could use in a campaign to deter car owners from pavement parking

Stephanie Sainsbury 's Gravatar
Stephanie Sainsbury

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

If I didn't park on the pavement, we parked on the road bus and emergency services wouldn't get through. I would love the local council to put us a drive in as it has done to half the estate. It is not that simple to not park on the pavement as the roads are not wide enough for todays modern vehicles. My car gets scratched, I have lost so many wing mirrors

Chris Twigg's Gravatar
Chris Twigg

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

With more online deliveries it is becoming more common to find vans and cars parked on pavements thus hindering wheelchair users and parents with prams. In most cases the offenders are apologetic and move on but some just do not care. Any law needs to go with a good awareness campaign.

andrew  hudson's Gravatar
andrew hudson

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

I am in both camps here as i have a wav van to carry my mobility scooter and obviously drive, I can understand disabled and pushchair users etc, but the major problem is there are thousands of residential streets built long before the cars became a problem, many were built when horse and cart were the major road users there are large numbers of these streets in the area I live in if pavement parking was abolished and large fines brought in the emergency services just could not have access, and it is a total waste of time trying different roads in the locallity, they all have the same problem too many cars not enough parking for them all. I also live next to a large primary school and the times we have been blocked in or out of our own driveway and frequently when politely asking not to park there more often than not you get a terrible mouthful of abuse and they still leave there car where it is parked.

Trevor Thomas's Gravatar
Trevor Thomas

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

Never mind cars on the pavements bicycles are a huge problem , I am deaf and partially blind with loss of balance control but I am expected to step into hedges , other people's gardens and the roadway to allow cyclists to ride at speed along the pavements, some offenders are my age group 60`s + I`m 65 yrs old . Yes cars can be a problem too but nothing compared to the latter growing problem .

Ian Busby's Gravatar
Ian Busby

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

To be fair most people park half on the path and half on the road leaving room for scooters, wheelchairs pedestrians and prams to get by to allow emergency vehicles to pass as many roads are not wide enough. Admittedly some ignorant people do block the pavement completely which then becomes a problem these are the people that ruin it for everybody including the people who park sensibly with the wheels on the pavement. These are the people who should be punished with heavy fines. But I’m afraid if all people are prevented from parking half on and off the kerb lives will be lost because emergency vehicles cannot get down a lot of roads. New roads need to be built wider to allow vehicles to be parked on the road and still be room for vehicles to get passed.

Alan Wright 's Gravatar
Alan Wright

Monday, October, 5th, 2020

Pop up cycle lane now in Upper Shoreham Road, Shoreham by Sea, West Sussex So now there is nowhere for disabled people to park Shocking Especially as hardly any cyclists use it

Nick White's Gravatar
Nick White

Sunday, October, 11th, 2020

Pavement parking should be banned on all A and B roads; as a mobility scooter user I am often forced into the road by badly parked cars when trying to get into town. I live on a housing estate where it is almost impossible to use the sidewalks due to parking, however I realise that a ban in areas like this would be impractical due to narrow streets, allowances for emergency vehicles etc - main roads should be seen as a separate issue though.

Al Berwick's Gravatar
Al Berwick

Friday, October, 2nd, 2020

As a full time wheelchair user option three is the best way forward As a car driver I’ll find it annoying if it means that I can’t park on a narrow road by utilising part of the pavement resulting in a longer push to get to a destination but can’t have it both ways. Safety is paramount for all pavement users. Can we also ban bicycles too from pavements ?

Charles Mills's Gravatar
Charles Mills

Saturday, October, 3rd, 2020

This is an emotive issue. In many areas unless vehicles park on the pavement the roads would be blocked causing serious issues for the emergency services. The main issue is that drivers are insensitive to the needs of other pavement users especially in areas where there are schools which clearly shows that parents who drive their children to school are ignorant to the dangers they pose. As a wheelchair user this practice has caused no end of problems. Not leaving a wide enough gap to get through. Blocking lowered kerbs. Parking on corners so I can not see the traffic coming along the road to name just a few.

Philip Freedman's Gravatar
Philip Freedman

Saturday, October, 3rd, 2020

I think the easiest and least costly option is the third one (make all streets like those in London, unless stipulated). I am fed up having to either detour around cars parked on the pavement or turn round and go back the way I have come as I can't get off the pavement and back on, safely, the other side of the offending vehicle.

Sandra White's Gravatar
Sandra White

Saturday, October, 3rd, 2020

Stopping cars parked on pavements is generally a good idea. Although when it’s a small residential road it’s a bit of a problem. Small residential roads have cars parked on the pavement to give enough room for other road users to pass. Or for emergency vehicles that need access immediately

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H.J.Powell

Saturday, October, 3rd, 2020

I agree with the majority of the comments, but where my daughter lives is a very narrow road and parking on the pavement is only answer to parking as if parked legally the road would be blocked. That either means widening the road or no parking at all on the road.

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Johnny (false name)

Saturday, October, 3rd, 2020

Where I live there is no room for any people to walk on pavements, because there is either, a car fully parked on the pavement or van, it is also sometimes hard to manoeuvre around this van to even get into my own garage, or rubbish parked on the pavement, and everyone has to walk on the road. Cars and van parked on the footpath on a corner. So really something should be done about it?

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Bobbie

Saturday, October, 3rd, 2020

There’s no point in a ban on pavement parking unless it’s rigorously enforced. There are many challenges for wheelchair users and parents with buggies. Pavement parking and dropped kerb obstruction inconveniences or endangers people more and more frequently.

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Wilma Thom

Sunday, October, 4th, 2020

A total ban is the only way to make irresponsible drivers understand that their needs don’t come first. I’m sick to death of those big car and van drivers thinking they are free to park on pavements and in the larger disabled bays in car parks. Just because they don’t want their big car (possibly) damaged they cause unnecessary problems for disabled people. Any time I have challenged them I have had either a mouthful of abuse or a withering glance and they ignore me. Hand the problem back to them!

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David Adams

Sunday, October, 4th, 2020

There are locations where there is adequately wide pavements on busy roads where pavement parking is not only acceptable but essential to ensure the flow of traffic. This is something which should be looked at on an individual locate basis.

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Richard Webster

Sunday, October, 4th, 2020

I have accessed this via an email sent to my wife Kathleen. As I am the disabled person affected by pavement parking, I believe that I am better qualified to comment. I use a power chair and when faced with this situation it is not possible to get off the pqvement into the road as the kerb is too high. I then have to turn around to return to find a dropped pavement in order to vross the road to the opposite pavement, if there is one, or to travel along the road past the obstacle and rejoin the pavement at the earliest opportunity. This is dangerous and it is well known that wheelchairs are somehow invisible to many pedestrians and drivers. There are some VERY GOOD ones, but not that many.. My solution would be much more radical as the relatively small fines do not act as a detterent. I would have the enfotcement of taking the vehicle away to a secure compound onlly to be released on payment of a substancial fine, the cost of removing and storing the vehicle and 3 points on their licence.

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John Newman

Sunday, October, 11th, 2020

Some pavements are more than wide enough to allow parking without any impact on the largest of mobility scooters and there is no point blocking roads unnecessarily. I think the answer is to make NOT parking on the pavement the norm & allow sensible exceptions with signage/lines to show where it is acceptable.

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Barbara Lucas

Friday, October, 16th, 2020

I am a wheelchair user, and on several occasions I have been forced to use the road in order to get around a vehicle parked on the pavement. For this reason, I support wholeheartedly any measure which would help to prevent me from having to endanger my health and sanity! Please pass this law as soon as possible to prevent this situation from arising for me and anyone else.

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Irene Grierson

Friday, October, 16th, 2020

I think it’s disgraceful the way people park not only with two wheels on the pavement but sometimes the whole car there is no way someone in a wheelchair or someone with a prom can get past and it must be terrible for blind people with guide dogs because they are not trained to have cars

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Mary Wells-Walker

Friday, October, 16th, 2020

I have already written to my MP on this matter.

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Edward Bailey

Friday, October, 16th, 2020

I would opt for Local Councils using their detailed local knowledge to make appropriate orders. Here in Cornwall we have thousands of properties with no alternative to using road parking and that because of road width and the need to make provision for the passage of emergency vehicles parking on road+verge+pathway is unavoidable . Some towns/cities do have the ability, subject to finance, to make use of green strips between road and pathways for parking but to impose a Nationwide law on the subject would be impossible for residents. We are fortunate in having a short drive but others will not have access for parking off street. I have a vested interest in using SAFOs for both feet, knee braces for both knees, using walking poles, wheel chair and Mobility Scooter and a car driver

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David R Connell

Friday, October, 16th, 2020

Ban Pavement parking completely it's the only way it would work properly.

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Carolyn Saunders

Friday, October, 16th, 2020

As written by Ms Wells-Walker, blocking the pavement causes many problems but exemptions to a ban would be necessary in some instances, i.e narrow streets and cul de sacs.Certainly new estates are being built without adequate provision for vehicle parking and this needs to be ameliorated. Even where parking spaces have been provided there is no provision for visitors (who might themselves be disabled and need close access . I have come across her problem in that some pavements have a slope which gives the feeling of tipping over and that applies to disabled pedestrians too and sometimes means one needs to walk in the road - a situation often met in country villages. In other words the whole system of access for less able people across the UK needs a review taking into account different types of ability, environment and accessibility. I feel sorry for the disabled drivers in London who have access problems under the new regime of "everybody walk or cycle" too

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susan j donohoe

Friday, October, 16th, 2020

In my area, along the main road, there is parking on the pavement the whole iength of it and people in disabled buggies and parents with push chairs struggle to get by sometimes having to go in the road.

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julian sims

Friday, October, 16th, 2020

sooner a total ban the better ....i,am a full time user of crutches ...makes it even harder to squeeze past ...WHY should we be forced out into the road and all dangers that brings just because some motorist dont think about anyone except themselves

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Ian Smith

Friday, October, 16th, 2020

I favour option three as it is obviously necessary sometimes for someone to park on the pavement. As a wheelchair dependent person I am in favour of banning pavement parking otherwise.

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Diane

Friday, October, 16th, 2020

I can see both sides of this issue. I am power chair user and drive my vehicle from wheelchair and need space behind to lower ramp to get in/out in wheelchair. I used to pick grandsons up from school and parked couple of street away I never parked on pavement although some did or double parked, leaving their car so other drivers couldn’t get up or down the cull de sac some residents would deliberately move their cars from drives and park on road to make it harder for parents etc to park. Another problem some streets just not wide enough living on outskirts of Leeds in a village! also another problem cars parked over dropped kerbs so have to go back to find one, then wheelie bins in middle of paths householders out at work all day if residents don’t put bins in correct place they might not be emptied! so why can’t bins be put back where they were left, surely won’t put so much time on the job. My husband is registered blind so also has problems passing cars parked on paths, we both also have trouble where garden hedges are growing onto footpath plus dog walkers lots near us and not picking up mess he can step in it although very rarely goes out by himself but this time of year lots of leaves on ground covering dog mess not good getting it stuck in grooves in wheelchair wheels as I use it inside and out, poor hubby has to get so close to be able to see to clean mess off. Sorry for putting such a lot on my post

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susan j donohoe

Friday, October, 16th, 2020

I live in a small town and there is always parking on pavements throughout the main road. Disabled buggies and parents with pushchairs sometimes even have to walk in the busy road. There has been many complaints to the police, council etc., but still nothing changes.

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David Harrison

Friday, October, 16th, 2020

I agree that something has to be done about parking on pavements. The problem is that not all places can be in the same category. Where I live the road is wide enough to have pavement parking banned but where my sister lives it would be impossible to get down the street if there was no parking allowed on pavements. Therefore it must be up to individual councils to check the addresses & say whether parking is allowed or not & have wardens patrolling to give out PCNs.

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Rich Hurst

Friday, October, 16th, 2020

Briefly: Most people are sensible about this but many others are not and often behave like sheep or take their habits with them to other places. As soon as one person does it you can guarantee that other will follow immediately. We have lived in the same house for 30 years and although we don't have off road parking it is not necessary to park on the pavement outside our house and very few 'locals' do this. However, it is noticeable that most visitors do it regardless of seeing anyone else not doing it. I think there will be cases where it is unavoidable especially where parking on the road would obstruct traffic flow by reducing it to a single carriageway. On the other hand we have a main road where this is actually happening but locals don't park on the path because the path is too narrow. I don't think there is any single answer to this other than common sense or getting rid of the motor car! Good luck with the analysis. I suspect it will be more money wasted on feasibility studies and that nothing will actually ever happen, a bit like the perceived parking problem in our town that. to my knowledge, has been discussed since the 1950's. If it was a problem then, it is surely a bigger problem now (it is) but nothing will ever be done about it.

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Patrick Dulson

Friday, October, 16th, 2020

With wider pavements why not designate an area like a cycle way where parking should never be allowed but can be used by mothers with prams, wheelchair users and people with restricted mobility who have to use two crutches can still use the pavement easily. Any new housing and commercial developments should give allowances for free movement of pedestrians with either able bodied or restricted mobility

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joan Ward

Friday, October, 16th, 2020

I am in favour of extending the ban nationwide. Fairer to small towns where pavement parking can be a very real problem.

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joan Ward

Friday, October, 16th, 2020

I am in favour of extending the ban to the whole country. Fairer to small towns where pavement parking can be a very real problem.

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Pauline Cox

Friday, October, 16th, 2020

As a wheelchair user I believe all pavement parking should be stopped. I believe that in most cases CEO's are suitable to enforce this. Having roads where pavement parking is allowed would still force the vulnerable into the road and I believe that Councils should ensure adequate parking before planning permission is given, they should also ensure adequate road width on new estates so that parking outside a property is safe and viable. Too many homes are being built without provision for the cars that will be used, rather than an unrealistic hope that many residents will use bicycles which does not happen .

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Pauline Cox

Friday, October, 16th, 2020

As a wheelchair user I believe all pavement parking should be stopped. I believe that in most cases CEO's are suitable to enforce this. Having roads where pavement parking is allowed would still force the vulnerable into the road and I believe that Councils should ensure adequate parking before planning permission is given, they should also ensure adequate road width on new estates so that parking outside a property is safe and viable. Too many homes are being built without provision for the cars that will be used, rather than an unrealistic hope that many residents will use bicycles which does not happen .

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stella cozens

Friday, October, 16th, 2020

Pavement parking is horrid IF ALL THE PAVEMENT IS USED and mobility scooters cant either get down onto the road or get past the car. However, if they started charging against it in some places then traffic would come to a standstill. There are plenty of places ie that pavement parking should be allowed and plenty of places where it should not happen. So to blanket fine everyone would be WRONG as in some places it would be dangerous not to park on the pavement. There really has to be give and take in this world.

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Betty Billingham

Friday, October, 16th, 2020

Much as no pavement parking would be desirable I do not think it practical. In our street no car could drive down the middle as it would not be wide enough. Thus cars could only park down one side of the street. Where would the owners of the houses opposite be able to park? And our street is not unique. In fact that applies to the entire housing estate and all the others around. And town after town has the same problem. No it just could not work. The car is here to stay and now with the virus even more so.

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W. Jones

Friday, October, 16th, 2020

Pavement parking should be banned! Pavements are for pedestrians, poss scooters - which should be limited to 4kph! Pedestrians, wheelchairs users etc are often forced onto the road to get past pavement parkers risking life and limb in the process! Why do people park on the pavements? There are not enough parking places available, many people who have garages cannot use them a) because they are too small or b) the garages are used solely for storage. Many people park on pavements because if they parked on the road then the roads would be impassable to road traffic - a problem where I live! The road s are often reduced to one lane and there are often stalemate situations where no one can go fowarsd or backwards! The problem is often made worse by the sheer number of cars in use. I have often passed house with 4 or 5 cars ouside them parked on pavements, green land or orads.

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Peter Buckel

Friday, October, 16th, 2020

All pavement parking should be banned. Pavement parking on narrow streets is worse than wide streets because drivers try to keep enough road space for emergency service vehicles. On these streets, parking should be restricted to one side only and on-road, not on pavement. It will get much worse once electric vehicles become the 'norm' as in streets where there isn't any off-road parking there will be some charging cables across the pavements as I can't see any other way of getting power to a vehicle. The logistics of charging Electric vehicles hasn't been thought out properly by Government

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Razachas

Monday, October, 19th, 2020

There must be a desire to compromise with this problem. First we must recognise that vehicles are an essential part of our lives and necessary for a productive country. Parking on footpaths is often necessary when roads are narrow, otherwise the roads would be impossible for vehicles to use. The usable width of a footpath is often reduced by thoughtless homeowners overgrown hedges inhibiting the use of the much of the footpath, but they are never told to cut the hedges back to allow full use of the f’path. With an expanding population many people have to drive to a railway station, park and go to work by train. These workers are keeping the economy going and their problems need to be recognised too. Gated houses preventing callers and deliveries accessing their drives, forcing callers to park on the road also contribute to the problem, so they should be fined too. I understand people’s concerns and do not defend selfish thoughtless parking, but we need people in work, keeping the economy going, and allowing people to park is an essential part of that equation. Stupid banning and fining them is not the solution, providing sufficient free car parking at railway stations and shopping centres is a more sensible answer.

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Jamie Morris

Saturday, October, 17th, 2020

Could you make it clear where in the UK this consultation applies to? My understanding was that Scotland already has legislation being brought in that will ban all pavement parking - closest to option 3 - I think. In my opinion, unless it's made clear that a pavement is not part of the road, and therefore not a place motor vehicles are not allowed, there is no point and it is not enforceable at scale. There should be specific applications to allow parking. Not specific applications to ban it. So not allowed unless expressly stated should be the default.

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Mike Brown

Saturday, October, 17th, 2020

A long standing problem that will never be solved. Why? Because there is insufficient will and resources to tackle it. In our area pavements are occupied by vehicles parking. completely on the pavement, all four wheels, and yet nothing is done. I have seen police cars pass these problems and do nothing. Out police force here accept that pavement parking with two wheels is not a problem, as long as there is sufficient space to get by. Yet sufficient space is not identified. In the 100 yards to my parents home there are some twenty cars blocking the pavement, despite many having driveways. I have had to buy a road legal scooter to get up there, even then I have had what amounts to abuse in doing so. As many respondents have noted it is already illegal, yet it is ignored. if we have to email the police to report a burglary, what chance do we have of they, or indeed parking attendants, clearing the streets for us? None I would suggest, no matter what change in the law. Any changes will only be effective if they are enforced. If they cannot or will not be enforced what is the point? Nearby to us our road is often blocked by builders wagons and vans. it seems that these folk must park within a few feet of where they work otherwise work is impossible. It is irrelevant to them if the road is blocked, the pavement is blocked, or whatever problems they caused. Such blockages prevent emergency or service vehicles getting through. Again, unless such matters are enforced, this will continue ad nauseum. Taking photos of the offences, which is what they are, and sending them to the police, results in - no action whatsoever! For me the solution is simple. Pay people to do the monitoring. Fine those that parlk on pavements, heavily, so that the fines will support the monitors. Have a central location that can accept photographic evidence so that ordinary folk can submit images , just like the police often request for other crimes, and then use them to send a fine in the post. We can all be monitors, and perhaps raise money for charity, if only there is a true commitment on behalf of the authorities, to rid us of this plague.

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Dorothy

Monday, October, 19th, 2020

there should be no parking on pavements ….the government are moaning about the cost ..slap some tickets on offenders that will pay for its self in no time I cant get up my street in my power wheelchair for parked cars The government are DISCRIMINATING against us

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Lisa Goncalves

Sunday, October, 18th, 2020

I most certainly agree with a ban on pavement parking, but i want to look at it from another angle if i could? The roads wherever they maybe in the UK do not have adequate width to allow parking. Think when the majority of roads were built, there were not as many cars on road kr per household. So this arguement needs to be addressed two fold.. Firstly widen and update all roads to allow two way free traffic and parking as well Secondly if pavement parking is an issue then like thwy have done in Southampton erect bollards to stop it an easy and concise method. The road in which i live is narrow built in the 60's no where to park for residents, so we have to park on grass in front of our properties or on the edge of the road on grass verges to allow traffic to get through.. Now ironically there is ample space to widen road and also to provide parking and yet no effort has been made to address it .. Very viscious circle

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Heather Riches

Monday, October, 19th, 2020

Third seems to ensure decreasing of pavement parking. Many times I’ve had to pull out into our towns main road A1890 - not easy to do safely

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Mrs. M. M. Barnes

Monday, October, 19th, 2020

This is difficult for many. Several areas were built before many people had any vehicle and the roads are no wider than the space to allow one way traffic. Disabled people had neither voice nor choice. Emergency vehicles must be able to reach people in trouble. I'm also aware of the needs of wheelchair users and parents pushing prams. In some places there is no choice. The thought of delayed ambulances or fire engines makes my skin crawl. Community care workers cannot be expected to park a long way from the client/patient though many are experiencing problems already. Council refuse vehicles also need unfettered access. Delivery services must continue, indeed these will be more widely required if the trend towards Internet shopping becomes more popular. People need to look at their own area and vote accordingly The current construction of cycling lanes means disabled drivers cannot park near local shops in some places. At least there is some acceptance that the wheel need not be uninvented.

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Peter Davies.

Tuesday, October, 20th, 2020

as far as i am aware, the offence of obstruction has been on the statute books for many, many years and i remember using this back in the sixties when as a police officer ,this offence was used a lot instead of local parking restriction regulatios. Peter Davies.

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Howard Wright

Thursday, October, 22nd, 2020

Since the pavements were originally constructed for housing estates more and more green communication cabinets have been installed narrowing the width of the pavement even without vehicles part parking on them. So when a car or van parks on the kerb adjacent to a box it is near impossible for someone to pass between cabinet and vehicle so impossible for someone with a child buggy. Roads are for vehicles pavements are for pedestrians