News & Features

Join Us in Supporting Guide Dogs to Tackle Pavement Parking

Posted in General News on Thursday, December 23rd, 2021

The charity Guide Dogs has launched new action urging the Secretary of State for Transport, Grant Shapps to prioritise tackling the issue of pavement parking. 

It has now been a year since the UK government ran a public consultation to find out people’s views on pavement parking. However, the government still has not stated what firm action they are going to take to tackle the issue. Therefore, those with disabilities and visual impairments are still put at risk as vehicles parked on the pavement force them out onto the road and potentially in the path of oncoming traffic. With 2022 on the way the government can take concreate action against pavement parking and give disabled people and those with visual impairments their independence.  

We are joining Guide Dogs and asking the Secretary of State for Transport to take action to tackle dangerous pavement parking. Will you ask him too? https://bit.ly/3F6O0oA. 

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Anita Phillips 's Gravatar
Anita Phillips

Friday, December, 24th, 2021

It is also the damage this sort of ignorant parking causes. Holes & broken paving slabs. They do not get repaired by LA’s & can cause accidents for those walking, & those walking with Mobility problems. Also, I have fallen over using a walker, which went down a ‘hole’ that was filled with leaves & disguised the damage. The same can happen using wheelchairs & Mobility scooters, as well as pushchairs. If pavement parking could be stopped, will repairs be done??? I doubt it.

Anita Phillips 's Gravatar
Anita Phillips

Friday, December, 24th, 2021

The damage to pavements left by this sort of selfish parking is a big problem. LA’s do no undertake repairs. Their is the potential for those with Mobility problems to fall over. Walkers, Mobility scooters, pushchairs can turn over if they hit a lump or go down a hole (as has happened to me when a hole was filled with leaves). Any changes in the law will not be enforced as our problems are not a priority.

Joanna Whisker's Gravatar
Joanna Whisker

Thursday, December, 23rd, 2021

I fully support this campaign As a full time wheelchair user I am increasingly frustrated by the increase in pavement parking. Not only has it become 'acceptable' to park on the path but in some cases vehicles are actually parked on the path causing total obstruction. If I can find a driver and ask them to move, the vehicle is usually returned to the same place on the path as before. I have neighbours who park on the path despite frequent requests to them to refrain from such parking (we have off-road parking at the rear of our properties) + police cars are some of the worst offenders. I get exhausted asking people to move who park across dropped kerbs I like to smile and enjoy life but this situation takes any joy away and gives me a reputation as a 'moaner.'

Highes's Gravatar
Highes

Thursday, December, 23rd, 2021

As a wheelchair user pavement parking is a nightmare for me.

Ken Thompson 's Gravatar
Ken Thompson

Thursday, January, 6th, 2022

Before I retired I had a Post Office and we gave support to Guide Dogs , firstly and primarily because we all believed in their work , and also loved Dogs . I would ask please, that everyone who supports Guide dogs , realises their worth , and cares for them to support actions against dangerous parking , on behalf of all those who need that protection .

Elaine Gaussen's Gravatar
Elaine Gaussen

Wednesday, January, 5th, 2022

I absolutely agree that pavement parking needs tackling, especially where no need is shown and it is purely selfishness on the part of a motorist. This conveniences wheelchair/mobility scooter users, as well as people who have to walk with a rollator and those with blindness particularly. There are also a few difficult situations of historically narrow roads outside properties, where no restrictions are displayed and home owners with cars need to park - at least sometimes. Local councils should investigate such situations, refer to Highways to find ways of overcoming the difficulties and, as a minimum, at least install off loading parking places/lay-byes - wherever possible..

julian sims's Gravatar
julian sims

Saturday, December, 25th, 2021

whole hearted support for this... and its not just the blind,,,, try squezzing past inconsiderate parking on pavements when you on crutches....or a young mum with a pushchair ,,,, these people are very selfish...

Ken Thompson 's Gravatar
Ken Thompson

Thursday, January, 6th, 2022

A long overdue ask , and valid without excuse .

margaret chappell's Gravatar
margaret chappell

Thursday, January, 6th, 2022

This legislation is not before time. The problem is now worse than ever with pavement parking due to (a) more traffic on the road (b) excessive car parking charges and (c) irresponsible drivers. This is a problem that affects the ordinary pedestrian, not just the disables (of which I am one I trust that Mr Shapps will do the correct thing and ban pavement parking.

Jo Knowles's Gravatar
Jo Knowles

Thursday, January, 6th, 2022

Please stop cars, vans & lorries parking on pavements I have nearly been run over a few times as I had to go on road as my wheelchair could not get through the gap left by cars parked on pavement.

Margaret Devitt's Gravatar
Margaret Devitt

Thursday, January, 6th, 2022

The narrow residential streets around my home are often double parked with cars on the pavements & roadside, narrowing the roads even further & causing major obstructions for the disabled, mothers with children, the blind and elderly. The local authority & police take no interest & pavements are poorly maintained. The parking problems are exacerbated by the increasing number of men who leave their business vans & lorries in these residential streets overnight. Falls are frequent amongst locals using the worn pavements. I have had three this year because of obstructions & holes & irregularities in the pavements. The preference of residents who use their front gardens for parking to use pebbles which scatter over the pavements means it is even more difficult to walk along the pavements. Any attempt to remedy this situation would also help Local Authorities clean the streets, which they never do round here, & cleanse the drains.

Ann Ganter's Gravatar
Ann Ganter

Thursday, January, 6th, 2022

there is going to be a very big accident having to go onto a road where a car is parked on the path . this is un-acceptable even being in wheelchair and l have even seen people with walkers and also those with blind dogs this is even in Oxford and cars on the paths is not viable, some thing has to be done now rather than later l am very annoyed this should have been done years ago

John Roche's Gravatar
John Roche

Thursday, January, 6th, 2022

It goes with out saying why cars should not be parked on the pavement.

Ronald Murray's Gravatar
Ronald Murray

Thursday, January, 6th, 2022

Its not only dangerous for blind puople using guide doge but also for disabled people using disability scooters being forced onto the road to pass. Also for elderly people who are not so good on their feet..in my town they are parking fully on the pavements even though there are roadside parking bays next to them forcing people onto a busy road

Denize O'Leary's Gravatar
Denize O'Leary

Thursday, January, 6th, 2022

I use an electric wheelchair and have a Canine Partner assistance dog. A couple of years ago I was attacked in the street after asking a man to move his car which was parked all four wheels on the pavement, completely blocking the path. I was very polite but first he threatened to kill myself and my dog, lunging and swinging at us over and over again, then when moving the car he drove it at high speed at us, missing me by centimetres. I made my escape as fast as I could but he came after us even while I was on the phone to the police, still intimidating me and making threats. Unfortunately there were no police available to come out, and I had to make my way home with this nutter following me until he finally gave up. I was absolutely terrified. THIS is the reason we need to do something about pavement parking. I couldn't have gone around his illegally parked car as it was alongside a major road with constant fast moving traffic. A year later I was told they had finally arrested the man for parking on double yellow lines outside a school - he ran from police and was tackled to the ground. He was not charged as the CPS decided it had been too long since the crime had taken place.

Timothy Skinner's Gravatar
Timothy Skinner

Thursday, January, 6th, 2022

Use of pavements needs to be restricted to pedestrians with cyclists getting off. and walking. Damage to kerbs and depressions made by heavy vehicles is unacceptable on cost and nuisance to disabled, pram pushers, dismounted cyclists and sack trolleys with goods being delivered.

John Newman's Gravatar
John Newman

Thursday, January, 6th, 2022

The first step is to stop the problem becoming worse by ensuring there is adequate off-road parking in ALL new housing developments. In their wisdom, my local council has just granted planning permission for the development of 44 apartments with in total 72 bedrooms but only 32 car parking spaces. Lunacy.

Chris Gough's Gravatar
Chris Gough

Thursday, January, 6th, 2022

I totally understand and agree, I stopped double parking outside my bungalow because I felt uncomfortable now people can walk safely on the pavement.

Trevor Thomas's Gravatar
Trevor Thomas

Thursday, January, 6th, 2022

Perhaps part of the solution to this issue , is the reintroduction of Traffic Wardens as this problem has been must more widespread since they were made into so called Community Police whom are never seen now outside of Police cars . I am partially sighted myself and also almost profoundly deaf and am unable to control my balance too so I do understand the issue . However some roads are narrow and there is no alternative parking , to park fully on the road can cause obstruction to traffic and potentially car mounting the pavement to avoid collision , so it isn`t a black and white situation . Also there was an article which maintained that the Government intend legislation this year making this practice illegal so this campaign is a little pointless ? .

Jean Burton's Gravatar
Jean Burton

Thursday, January, 6th, 2022

Pavement parking is not only dangerous for guide dog owners but also mobility scooter, pram and wheelchair users and no doubt many other similar purposes.

J Brian Wilson's Gravatar
J Brian Wilson

Thursday, January, 6th, 2022

Being disabled you have to walk in road if the pavement is blocked.

Robin Hale's Gravatar
Robin Hale

Thursday, January, 6th, 2022

I have to use a mobility scooter to get around, and people who park their cars on the pavement are a real nuisance. If they're thoughtful enough to leave what looks like enough space to get past, they probably parked next to a lamp-post or telegraph-post or some other piece of street furniture. As for the selfish ones who manage to obsruct dropped pavement edges, meaning I can't cross the road, well, words fail me, and I am only sorry I'm not allowed to wreak some sort of personal revenge!

Philip Freedman's Gravatar
Philip Freedman

Friday, January, 7th, 2022

It doesn't only affect visually impaired people, but also those of us who have to use mobility scooters, as I invariably have to go into the road to join or face traffic and then have to continue until I can find a dropped kerb to re-enter the safety of the pavement.

K Stevens's Gravatar
K Stevens

Friday, January, 7th, 2022

Parking is not only a problem for disabled people, but also for those using a pushchair or something similar It can also reduce the visibility for those leaving adjacent properties.

David B's Gravatar
David B

Friday, January, 7th, 2022

If I am correct, and unless a change in the law has taken place, I believe that an offence of 'driving a vehicle on the pavement' for which the offender can be reported and subsequently fined, is still in existence. (Please correct me if I am wrong). - That parking a vehicle on the pavement is also an offence for which the driver can be fined. (After all, you would have to drive the vehicle onto the pavement to be able to park it there). Can these laws (however outdated), somehow be reviewed, revised and brought up to date to take into account what a pathway is provided for; and that is a safe passage for pedestrians, which include wheelchairs, prams and pushchairs, and to go some way to prevent the paths from becoming a convenient parking extension for inconsiderate and thoughtless drivers to use and abuse without consideration for the members of the community who are reliant on an unobstructed route to allow them to simply travel from a to b safely without unnecessary risk, which is the immediate effect when an obstruction (such as a car parked on the pavement) has.

David Thomas's Gravatar
David Thomas

Friday, January, 7th, 2022

I fully condone the efforts being made to stop pavement parking. It is just thoughtless and selfish. I am a wheelchair user and take my dog for a walk regularly. The situation has become worse over the last year or so due to all the vans that now deliver shopping to homes as well as takeaway deliveries. The attitude from some delivery drivers seems to be. "You'll just have to wait, mate" They are not too keen when I take out my phone and photograph their vehicle in the position it has been dumped. Some get quite aggressive as well. Going back many years, we were told that all premises open to the public had to be accessable to all. Yeah! No doubt after a lot of Waffle and empty promises nothing will get done Regards this thoughtless parking. Just like the accessability issues for disabled customers.

Gordon Turner's Gravatar
Gordon Turner

Friday, January, 7th, 2022

It's not just a problem for guide dogs and those with sight issues but also mobility impaired people who cannot get past these vehicles whilst using their wheelchair, mobility scooter, or whatever else thay use to assist mobility. I also have a similar issue in my local area when bin men leave the bins in the middle of the pavement, often all bunched together. Despite sending photos to my local council nothing improves despite promises. There are lots of thoughless people out there who never consider others, only themselves...soooo sad

Ronald Murray's Gravatar
Ronald Murray

Sunday, January, 9th, 2022

Its not only dangerous for blind puople using guide doge but also for disabled people using disability scooters being forced onto the road to pass. Also for elderly people who are not so goo on their feet..in my town they are parking fully on the pavements even though there are roadside parking bays next to them forcing people onto a busy road

David Buckwell's Gravatar
David Buckwell

Monday, January, 10th, 2022

Pavement parking should be made illegal at all times and stiff penelties should be issued to anyone who commits the offence.

Paul's Gravatar
Paul

Monday, January, 10th, 2022

Sometimes theres no alternative ie narrow road with parking both sides and places where pavement is defined by the “white lines” where do you suggest people park in these cases

Ann Ford's Gravatar
Ann Ford

Saturday, January, 15th, 2022

I use a mobility scooter and I am frequently forced into the road because of cars parked inconsiderately. A lot of drivers park blocking a dropped kerb which I have to use to mount the pavement. The roads I use are a bus route and if a bus comes when I am travelling on the road to find somewhere to remount the path it can be very scary.

Aly Hawkins's Gravatar
Aly Hawkins

Friday, January, 7th, 2022

Last year my 90-year-old mum visited me on her disabled scooter; rather than travelling back home on the same day, I offered to drive her scooter home the next day and took her home in my car. The next day I set off on the one hour journey to her house along public paths and roads. Within a few minutes, I came across my first problem; a neighbour had parked their car at the entrance to a public path, which meant I had to take a 5-minute detour to get back on the intended route. My next hurdle was two vans parked on the footpath outside a residence, it was also dustbin collection day, making the access on the path was completely blocked. I had to get off the path onto a very busy main road ( no dropped kerb)and blindly pull out from behind the parked vans to get passed, frightening! Along the remaining journey, I noticed missing drop curbs, poorly maintained paths and roads and badly parked cars and vans. By the end of the journey, I felt frazzled and glad to have arrived safely. I have definitely seen another side as an able-bodied person and feel this is a problem that needs to be addressed.

Edmund Hobby's Gravatar
Edmund Hobby

Friday, January, 7th, 2022

As a probationer police officer in the mid 1970's I had several successful prosecutions for driving and leaving the vehcicle on the footway. It was under the Highways Act of 18 something. If I remember correctly sec 36 of the RTA of ? Had row sections a and b one was for lorries and the other cars, The lorry section was ratified. I am disabled and am much vexed by the ignorance of the average motorist including I am sorry to say police officers who also park on the pavement. There is also the offence of unnecessary obstruction. Sorry to go on BUT the Govt has merely to ratify the old act and traffic offence enforcers have got to address this epidemic. That is Traffic Wardens and police alike. Here where I live I have even seen a police car parked on a pedestrian crossing and there is no excuse for that even in an emergency. Sorry done the job so I have some idea of what can be done by Govt and enforcers.

Chris Willerton's Gravatar
Chris Willerton

Friday, January, 7th, 2022

I park half on the pavement and half on the road. I leave about 1.5 metres on the pavement, which is enough for mobility scooters and three wide prams to get past. I live on a main road. There are no parking spaces nearby, and like many, I cannot walk far to my vehicle, and an act as simple as unloading food shopping means I have to be outside my house. If it is a blanket ban, myself and my neighbours (some of whom are old and struggle with their mobility) would have nowhere to park all of a sudden and some of us would have to get rid of our cars. If some people didn’t park half on the pavement around my area in Greater Manchester with terraces either side and parked fully on the road on both sides, the road wouldn’t be passable, so it is not a simple solution! Many people including myself would not park partially on the pavement if we had any choice, particularly for myself as the damage done to previous cars on the road side accidentally is costly, as is the intentional vandalism done on the pavement side. Disabled Motoring supporting a pavement ban, whilst initially laudable, doesn’t seem to have been given much thought to us disabled motorists that don’t have the luxury of drives or garages or those of us whom do not live in nice cul-de-sac or nee housing estate where the roads are quiet. We park partially on the pavement and continue to do so precisely because we are a disabled motorist!

Mark weaver's Gravatar
Mark weaver

Friday, January, 7th, 2022

Pavements are for walkers and wheelchairs and guide dogs .now pushbikes are told to use pavements . The pavement is not an exstension of peoples driveways or car park fare dodgers.